Monday , June 17 2024

7 Pretty Perennials That Bloom in the Fall

7 Pretty Perennials That Bloom in the Fall

Extend the beauty of your garden by choosing plants that flower late into the season, many of which can endure past the initial frost.

Don’t let your garden’s allure fade away as summer turns to autumn. Smart gardeners arrange for a succession of blooms that run from spring through fall. By opting for perennials that bloom in the fall, you can continue to enjoy the vibrant colors in your garden well beyond the end-of-summer festivities.

While some trees in your garden may offer stunning autumn leaves, fall-blooming perennials can enrich the entire landscape with diverse colors and textures. Autumn is also an excellent time for introducing new perennials into your garden. If you haven’t already incorporated some of these late-blooming varieties, now is a great moment to do so.

1. ‘Standing Ovation’ Little Bluestem

‘Standing Ovation’ little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) is a unique variation of this native warm-season grass that maintains an upright posture throughout the autumn months, unlike its more common counterparts that tend to droop. In addition, it is resistant to deer and can withstand drought conditions.

This attractive grass thrives in full sunlight and soil that drains well while retaining some moisture. It can reach heights of up to 4 feet and is suitable for Zones 3-9.

2. ‘Fireworks’ Goldenrod

‘Fireworks’ goldenrod (Solidago rugosa) is a standout addition to many autumn gardens and has received numerous accolades. It’s a resilient plant that attracts pollinators and can grow impressively tall — up to 8 feet. This autumn-flowering perennial also offers the advantages of being deer-resistant and tolerant to drought. Contrary to popular belief, its pollen doesn’t contribute to seasonal allergies, which are usually caused by simultaneously blooming ragweed.

This vibrant plant flourishes in conditions ranging from full sunlight to partial shade, and prefers soil that drains well. It can achieve heights of up to 8 feet and is well-suited for Zones 4-8.

3. Pitcher Sage

Pitcher sage (Salvia azurea) is a native plant from North America and serves as a good substitute for Russian sage. This perennial blooms in the fall, is both deer-resistant and drought-tolerant, and draws birds with its striking blue flowers. It’s worth noting that, unlike some other salvia types, pitcher sage is not intended for culinary use.

For best results, place this pretty plant in partial sunlight and soil with good drainage. It can grow up to 5 feet in height and is suitable for Zones 5-9.

4. ‘Adagio’ Maiden Grass

Fall is the season when numerous delicate ornamental grasses come into their own. Among the diverse types of maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis), ‘Adagio’ stands out for its compact growth pattern. Additionally, it’s a sterile variety, which means it won’t spread seeds throughout your garden and become a nuisance.

‘Adagio’ thrives in conditions ranging from full sun to partial shade, with soil that drains well. It can reach heights of up to 5 feet and is appropriate for Zones 5-9.

5. Leadwort

Just as other plants are losing their luster, hardy plumbago, also known as leadwort (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides), offers a splash of vibrant blue blooms in the autumn. This ground cover is drought-resistant, making it a great choice for covering empty, dry areas in your garden.

Plant leadwort in full sun to partial shade and well-draining soil for it to flourish. It grows to a maximum height of 12 inches and is suitable for Zones 5-9.

6. Mexican Bush Sage

Reaching its flowering peak as the weather cools, Mexican bush sage (Salvia leucantha) showcases an array of wand-like blooms in shades of pink and purple. These flowers are a magnet for both hummingbirds and butterflies.

Best grown in full sunlight and soil with good drainage, Mexican bush sage can reach heights up to 3 feet. It is well-suited for Zones 7-10.

7. ‘Honorine Jobert’ Windflower

Known for their shades of white, lavender and pink, windflowers (Anemone x hybrida) have been a staple in U.S. gardens for more than a century, and rightly so. They are simple to cultivate and thrive even in shaded areas, providing blooms long after other plants have lost their color. The ‘Honorine Jobert’ variant is particularly popular, featuring white petals with yellow centers on slender stems that sway in the wind.

This gorgeous plant performs well in conditions from full sunlight to partial shade, and prefers well-draining soil. It grows to a maximum height of 3 feet and is suitable for Zones 4-8.

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